Marketing Your Fundraising Event – 5 Creative Strategies

By John Haydon, Originally Posted Here.

Marketing your fundraising event is arguably one of the most important aspects of holding a fundraiser.

If you don’t promote your event, how will people know about it? And if no one knows about it, how will you receive donations?

Your focus must be on properly marketing your fundraising event to avoid empty seats and empty donation boxes.

Here are 5 marketing tips you can follow to promote your fundraising event:

  1. Secure sponsors
  2. Use merchandise to promote the event
  3. Pick your best features
  4. Focus on your cause
  5. Plan a fantastic follow-up strategy

Your plan to act will include measuring success through product sales, appropriate implementation of technology, and promotion of your cause. All the while, you’ll be building lifelong relationships with sponsors and supporters, creating the perfect strategy to guide you through your fundraising event.

Read on to create your marketing plan for your next event. And if you need some ideas before you start marketing, check out Double the Donation’s 61 Awesome Fundraising Ideas for inspiration.

1. Secure sponsors

Sponsors provide key funding and a great opportunity to attract a broader range of attendees.

Once you have your sponsors, you’ll want to take steps to make sure they have a good experience so they’ll partner with you in the future.

  • Be upfront about what their involvement will be. Is this a small time commitment or a large one?
  • Keep them in the loop where necessary. Your sponsors will most likely want updates on your progress, with details including the number of attendees your event expects to bring in.
  • Demonstrate your gratitude for each of your sponsors. Remember these are the people who are directly supporting you. Make sure they know you’re not taking them for granted.

Keep in mind, sponsors are a crucial component when it comes to the success of your event and nonprofit, so make sure they’re happy!

2. Use merchandise to promote the event

You can design and sell custom merchandise to create buzz for your event.

Product fundraising will kill 4 birds with one stone:

  • Raise brand awareness: Putting your logo and information on a t-shirt, water bottle, or draw-string bag will provide amazing advertising opportunities for your cause.
  • Demonstrate appreciation: Merchandise can serve as thank yous to donors!
  • Generate revenue: Selling merchandise will create more revenue, adding to your funding.
  • Advertise sponsors: Discuss with your sponsors where you’ll advertise their brand. Your most supportive sponsor should have the most advertising material. For example, their logo might be on all the signs, tents, and t-shirts whereas a lower-tier sponsor may have their logo on a water fountain.

Using merchandise is a quick and easy way to raise money and advertise your upcoming event all at once so plan to order some t-shirts!

3. Pick your best features

The interesting and attracting aspects of your fundraising idea are your best features. Be sure to focus your marketing around these points in order to attract the most attendees. But keep your cause in mind as well!

You can do all this by:

  • Write an event mission statement. You’ll want to assess what’s really important to your nonprofit and why you’re holding the event. Think about how this event is going to impact your cause. How will your event matter?
  • Marketing your big ticket item. Advertise the most exciting aspect of your event, whatever it may be. For example, if the event is a concert, advertise the most well-known band performing. Show off what will bring the most people to your event.
  • Give participants next steps to get involved. While the event approaches, you can suggest supporters join your email list, which can give them a countdown to the event and other updates to keep them interested in your nonprofit’s work. Find a way to get them involved in your nonprofit’s community.
  • Picking out your best features will draw more attendees to your event, giving both your nonprofit and your cause more exposure. This can lead to more donations and overall support, so it’s important to understand your intent and market your best-selling aspects to involve potential attendees.

4. Focus on your cause

If you focus your passion on your cause, you have the potential to attract others with similar passions, which can build lasting relationships.

Ways to display your cause and your accomplishments are as follows:

  • Slideshow: A slideshow is an easy way to show off your cause. Throw some pictures of your board from previous activities and project the slideshow onto a screen at your event.
  • Video: A step up from a slideshow, a video will be a little more engaging because it’ll require more attention at your event. You can display it similarly to a slideshow.
  • Guest speaker: Have an executive director or service recipient speak to your past support for the community and for your cause. Stay away from self-congratulatory speeches and focus on the impact in a heartfelt and genuine way.
  • Brochure: At your event, you can hand out a packet with information on your nonprofit, its history, and your cause. This way, your attendees can take the information home with them, too.

The idea behind your event is to raise awareness about your cause, so be sure to display your efforts so attendees know your organization’s mind and heart are in the right place. This will gain authority for your nonprofit as well.

5. Plan a fantastic follow-up strategy

Thank everyone within 3 days of your event. This includes attendees, donors, fundraisers, and anyone that contributed to your cause. Follow this advice on how to Make Your Donor Feel Like a Hero. You can send thank you emails or letters, or to be even more personal with a phone call.

Your donors will want to know how they’ve positively impacted your nonprofit. You can easily do this through your emailed newsletter. Let them know how much you raised and update them on your cause.

Your follow-up strategy is key for donor retention. You should look into sending out surveys to further gauge the results of your event. With the feedback from these surveys, you can learn what you should do to improve when planning your next event.

Now that you know how to perfectly market your next event through these 5 steps, it’s up to you to take action and hold a successful fundraiser.

About The Author

John Haydon is one of the most sought-after nonprofit digital marketing experts, with a sincere passion for changing the world. He has spoken at the Nonprofit Technology Conference, New England Federation of Human Societies, New Media Expo, BBCon, Social Media 4 Nonprofits, AFP New Jersey, and several others. John is also the author of Facebook Marketing for Dummies and Facebook Marketing All-In-One (Wiley) and is a regular contributor to the Huffington Post, Social Media Examiner, and Social Media Today.

You Can Do It! 5 Tips to Get Your Fundraising Print Publications #OnPoint

Strategies and tactics in fundraising may change, but print publications continue to be a critical resource in the nonprofit toolbox. According to Kivi Leroux Miller’s 2016 Nonprofit Communication Trends report, print remains one of the top five most important communication channels in the nonprofit sector.

Image Credit: Kivi Leroux Miller

Every nonprofit should invest in creating compelling fundraising publications. However, in the tumult of other pressing needs, many small nonprofits put off developing their annual reports, cases for support, and other collateral to save money. Let me put this simply: in ANY business, you must spend money to make money. Nonprofits are businesses; ergo, nonprofits need to spend money to raise money.

I hear you now: “That is all fine and good, Heather, but let’s live in reality. We do not have the money or the staff or the time or the expertise to do print publications.” But you do and you can, because you must. You do not have to hire a big consulting firm to make a great publication. You can do it with existing resources—including your Board and volunteers—if you focus on best practices and follow these five tips.

1. Define your expectations in writing. I use a questionnaire to start any publication project. I ask lots of questions of the nonprofit, like:

  • What is the purpose of your publication? Why is this effort important?
  • Who is your primary target audience? Secondary audiences?
  • What is your fundraising goal(s), in $$, related to the purpose?
  • Who is the project lead (one point of contact only)?
  • Who are your internal decision-makers (i.e. who has the authority to approve proofs)?
  • What channels do you currently use to communicate with your current and potential donors?
  • What is the geographic scope of the fundraising effort?
  • If people could use only three words to describe your organization, what would you want those three words to be? (ex. conservative, progressive, friendly, casual, professional)
  • What three words describe how you do NOT want to be perceived in the community?
  • What collateral have you published recently? Which is your favorite?
  • Does your organization have a style guide or do you reference a major style guide as a standard (AP, Chicago, etc.)?
  • How do you plan to distribute your publication?
  • What’s your print budget?
  • What is the deadline to go to print?

2. Use a team approach. Fundraising publications are of the highest quality when more than one brain or set of eyes is involved. Gather a team together and identify a project leader. (That could be you.) Delegate tasks, and serve as the hub of all the work that goes into the publication. Work with other staff and volunteers to get it done. #ProTip: Find a friendly graphic designer who may be willing to donate some or all her time to the project. Moreover, did you know some graphic designers specialize in the nonprofit sector? They are out there if you look!

3. Allow adequate time for the project. Publications should not be thrown together in haste. That leads to mistakes and missed opportunities. Writing and design are creative processes that require a reasonable time investment. Do not give burden yourself unnecessarily by trying write, design, print, and mail, for example, an invitation in the space of one day. You can have publications good, fast, or cheap. Pick two, but you cannot have all three.

4. Print your publications with a vendor. I am realistic about budgets, and you can get away with printing some publications on your desktop printer (like invitations to less formal events). However, for publications like cases for support or annual reports, work with a print vendor. Digital printing is a more affordable option than traditional printing on presses, and the quality of digital printing is just as good as traditional printing (which was not always the case). Do you want to spend all that effort on creating a beautiful publication only to print it on your desktop printer and have it look unprofessional?

5. Set a deadline for final changes. If at the last minute, you discover a donor’s name is misspelled in the annual report, that is a simple fix. However, if at the 11th hour you decide you want to change the design or copy of an entire page, you are in for a world of issues: that is not a quick fix and will affect the flow of the entire publication. Plan for multiple stages of editing and proofing (including a formal final review), but be reasonable. If you are not, the revisions will never stop. Set and stick to your publication schedule.

How do you stay on time, track, and budget with your fundraising publications?

Are You Ready to Create Your Powerful Case for Support?

Check out our upcoming 90-minute live webinar How to Create a Powerful Case for Support – the Must-Have Fundraising Publication for Every Nonprofit. You will learn proven practices and strategies to create a compelling and powerful Case for Support for your nonprofit. Through the Case for Support, you engage donors—new and potential—through your credibility, data, and consumers’ stories. The Case helps you motivate donors to give by using storytelling and graphics.

About The Author

Heather Stombaugh is a nonprofit expert with more than 16 years of experience in leadership, programs, and fundraising. She is the founder of JustWrite Solutions, a national nonprofit consulting firm. She serves as an expert for CharityHowTo, CharityChannel, and Thompson Interactive. Heather is an officer of local and national boards (Grant Professionals Foundation, Baskets of Care, AFP Northwest Ohio) and an active member of the Grant Professionals Association (GPA Weekly Grant News Editor and Approved Trainer). She is one of fewer than 50 people in the world who holds both the GPC and CFRE. Heather lives and breathes nonprofits!

This blog was influenced by an original blog post, Pain-Free Publications, by Ericka Kurtz of JustWrite Solutions.

10 Ways to Use Instagram for Nonprofit Visual Storytelling

10 Ways to Use Instagram for Nonprofit Visual Storytelling

By Julia Campbell

Instagram is growing rapidly, with 26 percent of adults now using the social media network. Yet, only a few nonprofits include Instagram in their social media strategy…and even fewer use it properly.   

Here are 10 ways that you can use Instagram for your nonprofit visual storytelling:

  1. Post eye-catching, colorful photos.

The only way to cut through the clutter and grab attention on Instagram is with great photos. Photos that feature people in small groups, action shots, interesting angles, and bright, colorful backgrounds work best and get the most engagement.

colorful photos

 

  1. Write great captions.

Captions are incredibly important when building a community on Instagram. Use emojis to add some flair. Put the most important words and information up front, knowing that on mobile devices the caption is cut off after three lines.

Write great captions

 

  1. Use hashtags strategically.

Hashtags are a great way to search for new information and new accounts to follow on Instagram, and also a perfect way to be found by new potential supporters. Use hashtags strategically but seeing what others in your industry and around your cause are using. Take a look at what your audience is posting and sharing and what hashtags are trending.

Use hashtags strategically

 

  1. Update your followers on online fundraising campaigns.

Tell your Instagram followers about your online fundraising campaigns! Provide frequent updates on your progress, and let them know how much still needs to be raised.

online fundraising campaigns

 

  1. Showcase your mission.

A photo speaks 1000 words, but a caption explaining your mission and why you do the work that you do works wonderfully on Instagram. Showcase your mission and the beneficiaries.

Showcase your mission

 

  1. Go behind-the-scenes with your Executive Director.

People like to connect with people on social media accounts. Give your followers a glimpse into the life and work of your Executive Director. Make them feel like they are sharing an exclusive, intimate moment.

behind-the-scenes

 

  1. Re-post and share user-generated content.

Share photos and videos taken by your fans, followers, and supporters. They are your best ambassadors. (Always ask permission when doing this!)

share user-generated content

 

  1. Insert CTAs in the captions.

Insert your call to action right in the caption. Double tap/like – get more engagement. Click on the link in bio – take them to your website or online fundraising campaign page. People are more likely to take an action when asked directly.

call to action

 

  1. Participate in social media trends.

For example, the #2016BestNine was a popular hashtag – finding and sharing the 9 most popular photos that you posted in 2016 in a collage format. Another very popular trend is #ThrowbackThursday/#TBT where social media accounts dig into their photo archives for fun and entertaining pictures to post.

social media trends

 

  1. Post videos!

Video is the most popular type of content across social media platforms. Instagram video lets you post a 60 second video, which you can upload to the app or take directly within the app. Post short videos in the field, at meetings and events, and to announce a milestone or special news. You can also use Instagram live video to connect with even more followers, since there is a sense of urgency as they are not archived and you can not view them once the broadcast has ended.

videos

 

What other ways do you use Instagram for visual storytelling? Share them with us in the comments section of the website or via social media.

Looking for more detailed advice about all things digital marketing, online communications, social media and nonprofits, visit us here!

Join us for Julia’s brand new live webinar Instagram for Nonprofits: A Step-by-Step Guide to Using Instagram for Raising Awareness and Money for Your Cause

for more digital marketing and social media strategies.

About The Author

Julia C. Campbell, Founder of J Campbell Social Marketing, consults and trains nonprofits on the best ways to use digital tools to raise money and awareness for their organizations. Her blog is consistently featured in the list of Top 150 Nonprofit Blogs in the world, and she is currently publishing a book on storytelling and social media with Charity Channel Press. She has helped dozens of nonprofits small and large with their online fundraising and marketing campaigns, raising over $1 million for social causes.  

 

4 Ways to Use the Social Proof in Volunteer Recruitment

by Tobi Johnson, MA, CVA

When it comes to volunteer recruitment for your nonprofit, understanding human nature and psychology is key. Why? Because our brains determine everything we do. By better understanding what triggers humans to act, nonprofit staff can become better influencers and, ultimately, better marketers.
One of the most powerful and enduring psychological phenomenon is that of social proof. Over the millennia, our species has survived because of our ability to mold our behavior to that of our clan, or risk banishment and extinction. So, we have learned subconsciously that social conformity is linked to our very survival.

Volunteer RecruitmentThe power of the tribe is undeniable, even today. Peer pressure does not just affect teenagers. All of us are hard-wired to pay attention to what others say and do.

Consider Stanley Milgram’s famous obedience experiment. In 1969, he asked groups of actors to stop in a busy New York City street and stare up at a building window. As the number of actors increased, so did the number of passers-by who copied their behavior. This simple experiment demonstrated how the actions of even strangers could influence our own.

Social proof can also be harnessed for social good. It can help nudge community members interested in supporting causes like yours take the next step toward volunteering. Using social proof can help improve the effectiveness of your volunteer recruitment by subconsciously reassuring prospective supporters that volunteering is the “right thing to do.”

Today’s customers (and nonprofit supporters) can get a significant amount of info about your organization before they ever make a donation or reach out to volunteer. Consider the power of social proof in consumer behavior:

  • 92% of Americans now consult online product reviews before making a purchase (up from 88% in 2014).
  • 63% of consumers are more likely to purchase from a site if it has user reviews.

4 Ways to Use Social Proof for Volunteer Recruitment

By showcasing how other community members are supporting your organization through volunteerism, you send subtle messages to others about your “tribe’s” behavior. Here are four ways to highlight the social norm of volunteering for your cause.

  1. Volunteer Testimonials – Create a “why we give our time & talent” or “what it’s like to volunteer” message wall in your lobby or on your website with words and pictures form actual volunteers.
  1. Progress Bars (with People) – Display a classic thermometer or countdown, based on your volunteer recruitment goals and update it regularly to show progress and community support.
  1. Volunteer & Client Success Stories – Share the personal trials and tribulations of volunteers and those they support (wither they be direct service clients or paid staff members). These are even more persuasive when teams tell an emotional story of triumph together on video.
  1. Reference Volunteers’ “Pro-Social” Behavior – Reinforce the norms you are striving for by sharing messages that reflect your specific expectations (while being truthful, of course). For example, “95% of people who request a volunteer application complete it and turn it in within one week” or “the average volunteer donated 6 hours last month, helping us reach our goal of serving 45 youth” or “87% of volunteers log their volunteer hours on time each month.”

In addition, social cues are even more powerful when they are demonstrated through photos. A picture is truly worth a thousand words, and photos will increase the perceived truthfulness of your testimonials. So whenever possible, include actual photos of your volunteer fans.

Beware of Negative Social Proof in Volunteer Recruitment

Similarly, negative social proof, or promoting what people aren’t doing, can be equally powerful but will work against you. So, avoid desperate pleas for help, highlighting the fact that not enough people are volunteering. This only casts doubt, subconscious and otherwise, that your cause is worthy of support. So, always highlight positive behavior in your appeals.

If you use volunteers, you no doubt invest a lot of time and effort in volunteer recruitment activities. Be sure to make them eve more effective by working with human nature not against it. Highlighting social proof is the #1 best way to tap into our inner instincts and nudge people toward your opportunities to make a difference.

Want to Learn More About Volunteer Recruitment?

Check out our upcoming 90-minute live webinar How to Find & Recruit Your Volunteer Dream Team – a Step-By-Step Guide on January 19th (3pm EST) or January 24th (1pm EST). We will share a simple process for recruiting your dream volunteers in ten steps and bonus materials that help translate learning to action.

About The Author

Tobi Johnson is President of Tobi Johnson & Associates, a consulting firm whose mission is to help nonprofit organizations strengthen their volunteer engagement strategy. In 2015, Tobi launched VolunteerPro, an online learning and networking community for leaders of volunteers. Tobi is also the author of Chapter 1 of the anthology Volunteer Engagement 2.0: Ideas and Insights for Transforming Volunteer Programs in a Changing World.

Show, Don’t Tell: Why Your Nonprofit Needs Data Visualization Tools

charity infographic general - puchased by JWSYou’ve seen them all over the interwebs. You run into them as you’re scrolling through your feed on Facebook, as you’re checking your Twitter updates, as you’re looking for remodeling ideas on Pinterest.

They’re infographics, and they’re everywhere. But more importantly for nonprofits: infographics (and other data visualization tools) are not a passing trend. It’s time you add them to your fundraising toolbox.

Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data, or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly. Other data visualization tools—like charts, graphs, pictograms, gauges, dashboards, etc.—similarly present data in a pictorial or graphic format.

Why should you care?

Infographics and other data visualization tools:

  • Combine appeals to logic and emotions (a critical element of getting and keeping donors)
  • Engage 66% of all people who are visual learners
  • Register much more quickly with readers than narrative: visual cues are processed 60,000 times faster in the brain than text
  • Are visually intriguing and motivational
  • Give the reader’s eye a place to rest (especially when incorporated with appropriate amounts of white space)
  • Improve document readability
  • Can be published and packaged in multiple ways, making it a multipurpose tool

That last bullet point may be the most critical: data visualization tools can be used anywhere—social media, websites, cases for support, annual reports, and even grant proposals.

So, how do you create infographics and other tools?

As a nonprofit pro, my default response is use something free! And there are some high-quality, free tools available, like Easel.ly, Canva, Infogr.am, and Piktochart. I’ve used them all, and they’re intuitive, provide lots of layouts and options (even at the free level), and are user-friendly for those of us who don’t have graphic design backgrounds.

If you have the resources to hire a professional graphic designer or illustrator, do it. They are amazing professionals who can help you step up your game in developing compelling fundraising collateral. And you may be surprised to find a graphic designer in your area who specializes in nonprofit work – I know I was! They’re out there, and some of them are even willing to volunteer.

 

Looking for more info on how to make data visualization tools work for you?

Join me for the live, premium webinar of How to Create an Annual Report Infographic – A Step-by-Step Guide to Transition Your Paper Annual Report to an Infographic on May 17 or 24. If you can’t make the live event, no worries. You’ll still receive the recording and all of our bonus materials in your inbox. Register now!

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