How long does it typically take to set up a monthly donor program?

By Erica Waasdorp

How long does it typically take to set up a monthly donor program? From soup to nuts.

At a recent webinar, I was asked the above question.

The answer is: if you focus on it, you should be able to be up and running within a week.

I realize that development people in small to mid-size organizations especially are always pulled in multiple directions and distractions are easy.

That’s why I recommend you don’t launch the program until you have thought through and put in place the basics. But with a little bit of focus that can be done in a few days.

You most likely have the systems already in place. Brainstorming about a name for a program can be done in an hour or so. Creating a monthly donor donation page can literally be done in a few minutes. Adding the auto-responder and thank you email might take a few more minutes. Creating the hard copy thank you letter should be pretty straightforward based upon your thank you for one time donations.

I have one important recommendation: always TEST the process. Have someone make a first monthly donation and make sure that everything works and looks exactly as you’d like it to look before you go live to the masses.

Once you have these basics in place, you can start thinking about promoting the program. Instead of asking for a one time donation you’ll be able to start asking donors to consider a monthly gift. Start with people who are already caring about your organization. Your staff. Your volunteers. Your board. Then expand from there.

Don’t over-think it. Keep it simple and based upon what you’re already doing in your other areas of fundraising. Except that you’re now focused on generating sustainable revenue for your organization for many years to come. Your clients, children, animals, people you serve will benefit.

And, depending where you are on your monthly donor program, if you’d like to get some tips and pointers and handy materials to help you get started or growing, consider a Charity How To Webinar on monthly giving. You’ll not be disappointed.

About The Author

Erica Waasdorp is President of A Direct Solution, located on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  Erica lives and breathes direct response and fundraising and can be considered a Philanthropyholic. She has published one of the very few books on monthly giving, called Monthly Giving. The Sleeping Giant. She co-authored the DonorPerfect Monthly Giving Starter and Marketing  Kits and she regularly blogs and presents in person and via webinars on anything direct mail, appeals and monthly giving.

What Not to Say in a Grant Application

By Diane H. Leonard, GPC

Sometimes, it is just as important to know what NOT to say, as it is to know what TO say. This isn’t only true in real life scenarios, but also in grant applications.
Instead of talking about what to say in your grant applications (that is what we focus on in Grant Writing 101), we thought what if instead we focus on what NOT to say in a grant application?

Grant Application
Here are the 3 things you should NOT say or use in grant applications:

1. “We are not sure how we will continue the program after your grant funding ends.”

The reality is, you are seeking grant funding, so clearly you don’t have all your resource needs met or a major donor with an unlimited checkbook to support your work. You truly might not be sure which of the pending proposals will piece together to support the program in the upcoming fiscal years, but you DO have a plan for who you are asking for support from and when, *right?* You should share that plan. Outline the other types of revenue you use to support your programs to highlight how your organization is not grant dependent. Outline the long-term funding relationships you have in place.

2. “We hope to be able to…”

It doesn’t matter how that sentence ends. As the Rockstar organization that you are, you can’t, in fact, you don’t just hope to do anything. In a grant funded world you will do something. You don’t hope to create impact, but rather you will create impact. You don’t hope to increase knowledge, but rather you will increase knowledge. You don’t hope to change behaviors, you will change behaviors. You DON’T simply hope. Your organization to is good at what you do to simply hope.

3. Buzz words, phrases, or industry jargon

Including buzz words or industry jargon in your proposal makes it more difficult for the reviewer to understand. Words like unique, collaborative and impactful are all overused words in narratives. Reviewers begin to discount what those words mean as they have become such overused buzz words. Select impactful language that the rest of your narrative supports.
Acronyms annoy and confuse the reviewers. A fellow grant reviewer sitting on a panel with me once said point blank that acronyms actually made them angry and they would stop reading as a result. Unless you are desperate for space in a character counted situation, look at your response and consider how to eliminate, or at least reduce, your use of acronyms for the sake of the reader.

What other things do you have that are “no-no” items for including in the text of your grant application or the story you are creating for a grant application? Share them with us in the comments section of the website or via social media.

About The Author

Diane H. Leonard, GPC, President of DH Leonard Consulting & Grant Writing Services, LLC is an experienced and highly respected grant professional who provides grant development counsel to nonprofit organizations of varying size and scope. Diane founded DH Leonard Consulting & Grant Writing Services, LLC in 2006 and has secured millions of dollars in competitive grant funds for clients from the federal, state and local governments, and private foundations.

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